A Purchases vs Sales Report tells you whether you cost your recipes correctly, whether you are in control of your waste, and whether your margins are where they should be. If you don’t regularly count inventory, this report will tell you if you have the right balance between your purchases and your sales.

The report shows products that you have in your inventory, the total quantity of products you have purchased during the report period, the total quantity of products used in the menu items you sold, and the total amount of waste for each product. 

The report also illustrates the amount of each product in your inventory at the beginning of the selected dates of the report. It will show the calculated inventory level that you SHOULD have at the end of the period of your choice. This takes into account your purchases, sales and the waste of each product in comparison to your actual physical count of these products. 

Any deviation between the calculated inventory level (based on your purchases and sales) and your count will indicate a potential problem. Either your recipes are not accurate, your cooks are not implementing the recipes correctly or you have some “leakage” issues.   How to run the report:

On the side menu click on Reports → You will be navigated to our "Reports Center" → Click on the Purchase vs. Sales Report 

Counting Dates: 

1. If you have one count, the dates of the report will automatically set from that count until today. 

2. If you have no counts, the report will start at the beginning of the current month until today.

3. If you have two or more counts, the dates will reflect the last two counts.

Editing Dates: 

1. By default the report will consider only delivered quantities of each product. If you have orders that aren't delivered, they will not be reflected in your report. You can go to "sent orders" and set undelivered products as received. To learn more about how to do that, visit our Receive Merchandise article. 

2. You can include orders that were not delivered in your report by clicking on the dates at the top and toggling off "only delivered orders." 

3. To edit report dates you can click on the dates at the top and select the dates of your choice. Here you can also select a preset range by clicking on "custom date range."

4. The physical count dates in your report are indicated by a circle on the dates of the counts. 

Filtering your Report:

1. Once the data appears, you can filter it by Suppliers or Tags. You can also search in the search box for a specific product.

2. It’s possible to sort the columns ascending or descending in order to identify products with high deviation. Just click on the column title.

3. It is possible to show and hide different columns in the report using the column icon in the top navigation.

In order to export the report into an excel file click the Export icon at the top.  Columns Details Unit of Measurement: You can change the unit of measurement from the main inventory page.The data will reflect the unit of measurement you choose for each product. For example, if you measure milk by milliliters, your units sold will show how much milliliters were sold.  Purchased: Delivered orders will be reflected under the purchased column.  Sold: These are your sales for the selected period of time.  The data for this section will appear when the following conditions are met:

You are connected to a POS or you upload a sales file to Sales.

You have added your menu items with ingredients, and the item code of the menu is identical to the item code in your POS.

Wasted: Under the wasted column it will show how much waste was reported for that item, based on what was recorded in your wastage report. 

Purchasing Deviation %: The Purchasing Deviation is defined as the percentage left of how much you bought compared to how much you sold. The percentage of deviation is calculated as follows: (Purchased - Sold / Sold) x 100.

For example if you order 10 bottles of Coca Cola and you sold 7 bottles, your deviation is 42% (10-7/7=0.42 x 100 = 42%) which means you have 42% left of raw materials out of what you sold.

The goal is to decrease your deviation percentage so that what you purchase and what you sell are almost equal. If the deviation is very high, this can indicate weak points in your inventory. For example, quantities that are not entered correctly on menu or unnecessary waste and leakage.

Purchasing Deviation $:This value shows you the deviation in dollar amount based on purchase order prices. It’s worth noting that sometimes deviation can be high in percentage but not in the dollar amount. (received - sold) * average invoice price for one package. Price of sold goods does not include tax.

Beginning Inventory: Your stock levels at the beginning of the selected period according to your selection of dates and times when running the report. Selecting a physical count will give you an option to compare your theoretical and your physical counts. If you selected a physical count for the beginning inventory but the count was null (meaning you submitted an empty count for some of the items) it will take the theoretical quantities for these items. 

Expected inventory Count:The expected inventory count reflects your stock levels at the end of the selected period, taking into account what you purchased and what you sold since your last count. This is not based on your ending inventory count and is calculated as Beginning inventory + Purchased - (Sales+Waste). 

Ending inventory Count: Ending Inventory Count reflects your stock levels at the end of the selected period according to your selection of dates when running the report. If you selected a physical count for the ending inventory, but the count was null (meaning you submitted an empty count for some of the items) it will take the theoretical quantities for these items. 

Inventory Deviation: The deviation between your ending inventory count and your expected inventory count in the unit of measurement - (ending inventory - expected inventory)

Inventory deviation %:The percentage deviation between what you have in your ending inventory count and your expected inventory count (ending inventory - expected inventory) / expected inventory count.

For example if you count in your ending inventory 100 bottles of Coca-Cola and the system counts in your expected inventory 120 bottles of Coca-Cola, you calculate 100-120/120 =-0.16times 100 will give you -16%. You deviate by 16% from what you should have.

Inventory deviation $: This shows you the deviation in dollar amount. (Ending inventory- Expected inventory)* current catalog price.

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